Some people would suggest that progressive rock reached its high point in the '70s, faded in the '80s and has more or less been dormant ever since. But author Roie Avin is looking to change that perception, and we're pleased to present a chapter from his new book, Essential Modern Progressive Rock Albums: Images and Words Behind Prog’s Most Celebrated Albums 1990-2016.

The book details more than 50 records that have been released in that timespan, including works by Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree, the Neal Morse Band and Marillion, whose 1994 release, Brave, is the subject of the excerpt. To get the inside stories, Avin conducted interviews with Mike Portnoy, Neal Morse, Steven Wilson and more. You can watch a promo video for the book above, which is set to “Hangman” by Drugstore Fanatics.

Brave arrived after Marillion's commercial peak in the '80s, which coincided with their original lead singer Fish's departure for a solo career. It was their third record with new singer Steve Hogarth, who came up with the double-album's concept after reading a news story about a woman who was discovered by police on the bridge between England and Wales without a sense of her own identity.

Naturally, their label, EMI, wanted something commercial recorded quickly, but they fought for their beliefs and, with the guidance of producer Dave Meegan, it paid off artistically. Brave reached No. 10 in the U.K., a respectable showing but far from the chart-topping exploits of 1985's Misplaced Childhood.

You can buy Essential Modern Progressive Rock Albums: Images and Words Behind Prog’s Most Celebrated Albums 1990-2016 over at the Prog Report.