It'll be at least a little while before the artists included in next year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductees officially go public with their plans for the ceremony. But for former Yes singer Jon Anderson, a reunion with his ex-bandmates feels like a safe bet.

Anderson opened up about his feelings regarding the group's long-awaited induction during an interview with Rolling Stone, admitting that while he hasn't spoken with many of the Yes vets being honored with induction, he has no doubt he'll be performing onstage with them at the ceremony next April.

"I'm sure it's going to happen," Anderson affirmed. "I'm sure we'll all eventually let go of these feelings of frustration you have with people over the years."

As testy as things may have occasionally gotten after Anderson's departure from the lineup, he insisted he still sees them as family. Name-checking guitarist Steve Howe and drummer Alan White, he laughed, "You go through periods of time where you're totally ... Whenever I think of Alan and Steve, we're still musical brothers. Sometimes brothers don't agree with each other. It's the truth. But this is just one night, a lot of fun, a celebration. I think a celebration is good."

While he expects a Rock Hall performance, Anderson sounded a far more noncommittal note when it came to the prospect of a longer reunion. As he pointed out, his current trio project with fellow Yes vets Trevor Rabin and Rick Wakeman recently finished touring behind their former band's music — and for him, the trio is keeping that spirit alive.

"We know we're Yes in our senses even though we're calling ourself ARW. We're playing a whole evening of Yes music and the fans are going crazy," said Anderson. "This is just the last two months. It reminds you that in some ways I'm so damn fortunate to be singing the way I do and excited about writing new music with Trevor and Rick, which we're doing, as I was in 1972 at that moment in time when we did Fragile and Close to the Edge and we knew we were doing something very unique."

Yes Albums Ranked Worst to Best