John Mellencamp, one of Indiana's most well-known native sons, has gone on record against the state's controversial new Religious Freedom Restoration Act.

Mellencamp vented his dissatisfaction with the law, which has been targeted as a front for legalizing discrimination under the guise of protecting business owners' religious freedoms, in an op-ed for the Indianapolis Star. True to his typical form, he didn't mince words, blasting it as "discriminatory, hurtful, and a stain on Indiana's national reputation."

"I am not questioning the sincerity of those who believe they have acted in the interests of religious freedom," insists Mellencamp, "but I am resolutely stating my opposition to this misnamed and ill-conceived law."

As upset as he is about the turn Indiana's politics have taken, Mellencamp says he's reluctant to cancel shows in the state — as Wilco recently made headlines for doing — although he does admit he's given the idea some consideration.

"I have thought seriously about canceling my upcoming shows, not wanting the resulting tax revenues from ticket sales, concessions and the like to help fill the same government coffers that would enforce this terrible law," he continues. "But then I realized that I would be letting our government divide us again, keeping me apart from my most important audience: My Indiana fans who have been there for me from the very beginning."

Ultimately, Mellencamp sounded a hopeful note for his upcoming dates in Indiana, promising his fans will get exactly what they come for. "Our evenings together will be about music," he concludes, "and hopefully this situation will be made right by the time I see you in May."

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